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 Post subject: Moissenite vs Russian Brilliants
PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2005 11:01 am 
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:?: I have two questions 1) What makes Moissenite so expensive if it is not a real diamond; and 2) what is the difference between Moissenite and Russian Brilliants?


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2005 11:17 am 
I wasn't familiar with Russian Brilliants, so I Googled them and here is some information regarding them:


Is Russian Brilliants Really a Diamond?
No. Russian Brilliants® is a laboratory-grown stone that was developed in Russia and used in their satellite optics program. Being hand-cut it takes on many of the visual properties of a natural diamond. A one carat of Russian Brilliants® with its brilliance and fire is equivalent to the world's finest D flawless diamond valued at $16,000.

What is the difference between Russian Brilliants ® and other diamond simulants?
1. RBs are uniquely different as they are flawless.
2. They are guaranteed in writing to never experience a color change. Other simulants have metabolic pinpoint inclusions that implode, leaving the stone with a color change.
3. They are hand cut, faceted and polished like a natural diamond. (Ideal – Premium cut.)
4.Harder / more durable. Cuts glass. Like a natural diamond RBs can be personally laser inscribed. Heat of the laser will not affect the integrity of the stone.
5. Most trusted name in the industry. See BBB link on home page for details.


Here's a link in case anyone wants to read more about them. http://www.russianbrilliants.net/index1.html


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2005 11:24 am 
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I think we had a discussion about this on a long since crashed forum. Aren't Russian Brilliants just a brand name for Cubic Zirconia?


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2005 11:36 am 
That's what I thought too - but if you read the information on their web site they certainly aren't marketing them as CZ's, so I really don't know.

This is how they make the distinctions:

RUSSIAN BRILLIANTS®- fake diamond
Other diamond simulants with similar names are not genuine or authentic Russian Brilliants® RUSSIAN BRILLIANTS®ake diamond)
Russian scientists have taken a page from Mother Nature's achievement by replicating a gem quality diamond. Russian Brilliants® is classified as a diamond simulant. It was originally developed for use in the Russian satellite space optics program. These diamond simulants are hand-cut and come in different shapes and sizes. With their brilliance and fire they possess many of the same characteristics and optical properties of a natural diamond. They are very hard and will cut glass!

Personal I.D. Inscription Available. Inscribed by major lab and can be seen under 10X magnification. The integrity of the stone is unaffected.

Some jewelers have difficulty distinguishing between Russian Brilliants® and a natural diamond. Many jewelers & gemologists rate Russian Brilliants® as the best diamond simulant in the world. The eye appeal is equivalent to the world's finest D-E color, flawless diamond. Beautifully hand-cut, Russian Brilliants® is convincingly the closest clone to a natural diamond. The appearance of Russian Brilliants® is guaranteed to last forever. fake diamond

STANDARD CUBIC ZIRCONIA...Diamonique
At times man-made gems are more beautiful (rainbow affect) than the natural diamonds they imitate. Standard CZ will take on a pale grayish tone when exposed to sunlight over a period of time. This does not happen with Russian Brilliants®. Unlike a naturally formed diamond, almost all CZ components are purer and the molecules gather in ideal conditions. Couple this with an unsophisticated machine cut manufacturing process and you arrive at the standard cubic zirconia or diamonique stone.

MOISSANITE
Moissanite, although relatively new, does resemble a diamond. Larger sizes usually have a yellow or green tint. It has a silicon carbide composition. Upon close examination, moissanite is usually identifiable. This is because silicon carbide, in the manufacturing process becomes doubly refractive. The double refractive index diminishes the illusion of being a natural diamond. Smaller sizes up to a half ct do look good. The cost of this stone is priced higher than other simulants. For moissanite orders call U.S. (888) 991-1299, United Kingdom – 00-800-0234-5678, Australia – 0011-800-0234-5678.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2005 11:43 am 
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From the distinction they make it probably is putting lipstick on a CZ.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2005 11:46 am 
Here is some good information about Moissanite and why it is so expensive:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moissanite


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2005 11:48 am 
Doos wrote:
From the distinction they make it probably is putting lipstick on a CZ.


Yeah - the only difference seems to be in the cutting technique which supposedly keeps the stone from turning a grayish color over time.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2005 11:57 am 
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Interesting sidenote about moissanite.
If you place a moissanite on a hot plate, it will turn decidedly YELLOW! The color will fade as it cools.
This was discovered by Alan Hodgkinson http://www.scotgem.demon.co.uk/moisstest.htm
when he was doing some experimental work with Charles & Colvard http://www.moissanite.com/intro.cfm?flash=true

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2005 12:00 pm 
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On the home page

http://www.russianbrilliants.net/ they say:

Russian Brilliants® is unique, unlike moissanite and common cubic zirconia, they are hand cut, faceted…Possessing the fire, brilliance and many optical properties of a natural diamond. Russian Brilliants® has a written lifetime guarantee not to fog or yellow and is considered the best diamond simulant by many gemologists.

At $280 a carat for cubic zirconia, they can well afford to replace anything that "fogs or yellows".


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2005 1:50 pm 
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That's a good point. Never forget that a guarantee may not mean what it appears. This guarantee that a stone will never fog doesn't mean that it never will... it just means that they'll gladly replace any that do.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2005 4:42 pm 
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As is pointed out above, Russian Brilliants is a brand name of CZ. An interesting question about their advertising is the claim of being hand cut as a feature. Why is this good? Normally, there are weight retention, clarity and other topics that are important for the cutter but with CZ, none of this applies. The rough material is very inexpensive and waste is not so serious a problem. It's true that the optimum proportions for CZ are a bit different than they are for diamond and other materials but it's easy enough to work this out and then it becomes a question of repeatable precision cutting. Automated systems are much better at this sort of task than mere humans. 'Precision cut by the finest robots in China' seems like it would be a better claim.

I wonder if there is a 'shipping and handling fee' associated with replacing your defective stone under that guarantee.

Incidentally, I agree. CZ makes for a fine diamond simulant.

Neil

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Last edited by neil on Thu Oct 27, 2005 6:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2005 6:43 pm 
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I once purchased some CZ for about 11 cents per carat. How about recutting them by hand?
If we can even sell them for 100 $ per carat, then by Jove ... all of us can be rich !!! :twisted:


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 28, 2005 5:00 am 
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What is this 'fogging' or 'graying' of CZ? I've heard of it before especially in advertisements for Moissanite. Does this happen to the material internally? In my experience the only fogginess or grayness I saw in CZ was removed with a bit of toothpaste and a toothbrush. CZ is a very beautiful simulant, but it does look pretty nasty when it gets dirty, way nastier than a dirty diamond.

A couple years ago I got a hold of a beautifully cut CZ that is 2 inches in diameter. Really pretty stuff for the display cabinet!


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 28, 2005 10:31 am 
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:D Thanks to all for your insight. From the looks of your responses, there's nothing better than genuine diamond.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 28, 2005 11:37 am 
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There's nothing wrong with CZ or Moissanite, both are nice to look at. But in the case of the CZ, paying $280 a carat for something worth pennies/ct is kind of a waste.


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