New Mineral Named After GIA’s John Koivula
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 10:16 am 
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Thank you Bill,
as usual i don't read the manuals & tips........... :oops:

ciao
alberto

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 11:25 am 
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In your link you gave 640x480 is the recommended photo size with the caveat: "Larger may work but we can't say for sure since it was designed for 640x480."

Have you done more testing with larger pictures? Will they work?

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 11:36 am 
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OR, just use 640x480.
This is certainly large enough for most online documentation.
I suggest 400x600 as the maximum size for my forums and wikis.

Fig, do you have a series of larger pictures you are thinking of submitting?
Larger pictures require vast amounts of bandwidth to store and most users will reduce the size to actually view them.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 12:17 pm 
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Hi Barbra,

no not submitting, but for my own use (and if I submit I can always resize down to what is needed). I always do pictures at the highest resolution and best quality. In a few years what is highest quality today will be merely average anyway. Monitor resolution changes so quickly - 1920x1200 is quickly becoming the standard.

I have a few hundred of the old GIA slides which I will have to scan soon (at 3600dpi).

They were produced by the GIA in the mid 80s. End of 80s was the last time I gave courses on gemstones (still using analog technolgy).

Now I will have to give a course again which lasts for two weeks in Holland at the end of February. That is why I was hoping to use the pictures in Bill's programs. But I am afraid the resolution is too low for my purposes.

Guess I will have to do the scanning of the GIA slides - (dreadful sigh...).

And I will also (re)do some photos of my own extensive gemstone collection for this course. The old photos were mainly for insurance purposes made with a millimeter paper graph background for size estimation and not for showing.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 12:33 pm 
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Don't forget that the resolution possible with printed material is profoundly different from that possible on your monitor. :D
Remeber it is a function of dpi (ppi) with the comp.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 1:05 pm 
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Yes, Barbra, thank you for reminding me - but I have always found printing repugnant anyway. :smt118

Since I am a perfectionist by nature I have spent days maybe even weeks perfecting the printing of my memos, statements, labels, and invoices using cryptic DOS printing command characters when I programmed my gemstone accounting software that I must have developed a printing phobia. :lol:

It is so bad that I am thinking of buying a laser printer, since quite often my ink cartridges dry up on me and I have to buy new cartridges after I have printed a mere 10 pages or so.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 31, 2010 10:13 am 
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Alberto wrote:
Dr. Bill?

ciao
alberto


BTW, I'm not a Doc. Let's leave that to those who have earned the distinction.

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 Post subject: Puzzlement
PostPosted: Fri Feb 05, 2010 2:51 am 
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Lost reply somewhere in Cyberspace, repeat of current tests to improve Wise program and benefit Gemology on line gang.

Answer for Lukeness from S. Africa;
I have a master ident set of stones used to calibrate my instruments when I make a setup for testing. I record time, date, temperature, light source, as well aS RUN TESTS FOR EACH SPECIES FROM TEST SET.

DATABASES NEED DATA FROM GANG
Often I buy rough stones to facet, or better still stones cut too deep from 3rd world countries. These stones are cut to add weight, not for beauty. I use them as preforms. Using correct proportions, I often get superior results from imporperly cut stones.

When buying rough, one must have a simple test to seperate out salted
stones. Once when buying what appeared to be a small selection of Colombian rough, I wanted to send a selection of rough to a friend who was an American facetor. I placed a clear milimeter ruler on a flat bed scanner and my rough near the ruler.. ran a preview of the stones, then edited the image to only the stones and their ruler. The result was amazing.
The image of the Colombian oiled rough showed that some of the rough came out dark pink while other rough stones remained emerald green..
Further examination of the green imaged stones proved to be green glass.
Knowledge of locals of gemstone rough would be helpful for identifying salted rough as well as faceted millee. I now run flat bed scanner tests on all rough and millee.

The used Ebay computers that will accept a USB run flat bed scanner like CANON LIDE 30 on either a Compaq Presario 1200 or a Compaq Aramada 1700 will give similar results. It will be interesting if other flat bed scanners that use either a led bulb or flourscent bulb will give similar results. I am running Windows 2000 as well as Windows XP pro and get similar results.

A DATABASE OF FLAT BED SCANNED STONE RESULTS

Precussion database
When buying rough I also check for PRECUSSION STRESS LINES inside
the rough. Often to speed up production in gem mines, owners use explosives to remove the fragile crystals from pigmitites. The resultant
use os explosives often travel through the matrix and often creates
PRECUSSION STRESSES in gemstone rough. I look at rough under a
polariscope.
You guys can run a simple test. Look at some prescription eyeglass lenses in a polariscope.
PRECUSSION STRESS LINE DATABASE would help gemologist program a lot to determine precondition of stones in jewelry.

More DATABASES needed for Wise.
Puzzlement,
I read and take Gems and Gemology, except I build home made tools to see if I can get similar test results from my equipment. Test unknowns and then send same to GTL [Gem trade Lab] for identification. I use the results to see if my tests and those of GTL are the same or similar. I do this for my own education.
I am a great believer in LESS IS MORE. If the science is sound, then a careful gemologist can duplicate many tests and improve upon field and lab techniques. Sharing results with others on Gemology on line.com is a gamble, but it pays off, because if everyone tries to duplicate tests, we can develope databases that help all of us. One thing that seems lacking in identification is location of original mines for gemstones. The non-destructive optical tests help to show where stones originated.

CLAIMS FOR UNIQUE ENHANCEMENTS OFTEN FALSE
I have several video tests that show this to be true. I was the unofficial photographer and video taper of select lectures before the North Texas GIA-AA. using my computer as an ocilliscope to show audio results of lectures, I could see when the speaker waxed poetic, made little white lies, and told the truth. Further research helped me discover the truth of
many "secret" enhancements.

ENHANCEMENT ADHESIVES sold by NASA to industry
Adhesives or early epoxies, or glasses used to repair walls of space probes were developed by NASA so that spacemen, who developed a hole in a Moon probe, or Space Station could make minute repairs. Early epoxies were alright, but later the development of UV curing liquids were later licensed to industry. We see these adhesives in watch gaskets, dental
adhesives to implant caps on teeth, as well as in Fracture filled diamonds and other gemstones. These adhesives are often centrifuged into gemstones with heat, and under vacuum. Definitive tagants were developed so that NASA repair crews could quickly observe where repairs were made either in space, or if the vehicle renturs home in tact.
A DATABASE of TAGANTS COULD HELP IDENTIFY FLASH EFFECTED GEMS

My younger brother was an engineer on the International Space Station design. The tagants and adhesives are no longer classified. Could be food for thought for gemologists? winstone


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