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 Post subject: science to art...for the microscopic world enthusiast
PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2011 7:50 pm 
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I know you'll love it :-)

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The imaged object is a single crystalline diamond grain that is anisotropically etched by hot spheres of molten nickel (red). Self-organized nickel particles are obtained by sintering a thin Ni film (100 nm) that is evaporated on a polished diamond substrate. Self-organisation and etching are conducted by the following annealing procedure: 1000°C in 500 mbar H2, 24 h. (Image: Waldemar Smirnov, Fraunhofer Institut Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Germany)

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Nano Teddy Bear The scanning electron microscopic image (taken using a FESEM LEO 1530) shows the ZnO nanostructures on an indium oxide coated glass substrate deposited at 70oC by using a facile electrochemical deposition technique. A potentio-/galvanostat electrochemical workstation (CH Instruments 660A) was used to deposit the ZnO nanostructures by amperometry potentiostatically at -1.1 V (relative to the Ag/AgCl reference electrode) and a spiral platinum wire served as working electrode. An aqueous zinc nitrate [Zn(NO3)2.6H2O] solution was used as an electrolyte to prepare these ZnO nanostructures. (Image: Helia Jalili, University of Waterloo)

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Carbon NanoEden Garden of Carbon NanoEden (Image: M. de Volder, S. Tawfick, A.J. Hart, University of Michigan)

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SEM image of a micron sized trench (10 x 20 x14 µm3) in a Cu/SiO2/Si multilayer, obtained through FIB milling. The precision of this technique allows the visualization of ultrathin (tens of nanometers) layers. (Image: G.C.Gazzadi, S.Frabboni, S3 (INFM-CNR), Modena. Artwork: Lucia Covi)

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Dirty Dice Self-assembled 200 micron size nickel dice, imaged using scanning electron microscopy in the lower secondary electron (LEI) mode. The dice were colorized using Adobe Photoshop. (Image: Timothy Leong, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA)

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SiC-SiC Composite SEM observation of a mechanical test performed on a SiC-SiC composite. (Image: Francois Willaime, CEA/Saclay, France)

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Nano-Witch SEM image of crystalline wurtzite zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructure synthesized via vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) method. (Image: Wen Hsun Tu, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan)

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Nano PacMan made of copper oxide Scanning electron microscope image of a copper oxide cluster, 3.5 microns in diameter, prepared by evaporation and condensation over an alumina substrate. The smiley nose and eye are present in the original SEM image, which has only been color-enhanced. (Image: Elisabetta Comini, University of Brescia, Italy)

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Bad Pitch SEM image of microbeads lying outside a self-assembled 500 micron sized box. (Image: David Gracias, Johns Hokins University)

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Watermelon on Pandora Colorized SEM image of the superparamagnetic poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) microspheres with Fe2O3 nanocrystals self-assembly on the surface and inside. (Image: Yongxing Hu, University of California, Riverside)

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The silk collective. Silk, produced by the silkworm Bombyx mori, has been viewed for millennia as a prestigious and valuable material. This protein has recently found application as a high technology material in biomedical micro- and nanotechnology. This scanning electron microscopy image depicts a detail of a micro patterned silk surface, fabricated with an all-aqueous micro molding technique. The silk structures, measuring approximately one micrometer in diameter, were fabricated at room temperature and under ambient pressure. The research is performed in Prof. Fiorenzo Omenetto's group (Ultrafast Nonlinear Optics and Biophotonics Laboratory) and is part of "the silk collective" at Tufts University. (Image: Konstantinos Tsioris, Tufts University)

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Sucker Rings of Squid Tentacles--The individual toothed sucker rings of squid tentacles (highlighted in red) provide additional gripping power during prey capture and handling. These rings comprise a nanoscale network of parallel tubular elements, as shown in the background image which significantly alter the macromechanical properties of the resulting structure.
James C Weaver, University of California, Riverside.

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Field of Sunflowers Amorphous SiOx nanowire bundles have an uncanny ability to self-assemble into various shapes, including one that strikingly resembles a sunflower. In these sunflowers, highly packed bundles form the disc florets and loosely packed ones around the rim of the disc form the ray florets. The scanning electron image shows a field of sunflowers. The grey-scale image was mapped into pseudo-colors by graphic software. The nanowires grew out of the reaction of Si and oxygen, with molten Ga and Au acting as catalysts. Each nanowire is about 10 nm in diameter and tens of micrometers in length. (Image: S.K. Hark, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

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Hydroxyapatite precipitated from simulated body fluid on bio-glass substrate. Author: Katja Rade, Jozef Stefan Institute, Sloveni

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Pollens Source: Dartmouth Electron Microscope Facility (Public Domain Release by Dartmouth College).


Last edited by cascaillou on Sat Feb 05, 2011 2:40 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: science to art...for the microscopic world enthusiast
PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2011 8:12 pm 
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Wow! Just wow! Some researchers know how to play with expensive toys... in a simple fashion! :D

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 Post subject: Re: science to art...for the microscopic world enthusiast
PostPosted: Sat Feb 05, 2011 7:46 am 
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Awesome images!!
Now I know where the research money goes :)

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 Post subject: Re: science to art...for the microscopic world enthusiast
PostPosted: Sat Feb 05, 2011 9:40 am 
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definitely COOL shots!! thank you for sharing!!! :D
Hey Conny, psychedelic trapiche??? :lol: :lol: :lol:
ciao
albé

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 Post subject: Re: science to art...for the microscopic world enthusiast
PostPosted: Sat Feb 05, 2011 12:23 pm 
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SO FABULOUS!

I am completely awed. Drats now I want a scanning electron microscope.

I wonder if it would fit in Santa's sleigh?

So much talent.

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 Post subject: Re: science to art...for the microscopic world enthusiast
PostPosted: Sat Feb 05, 2011 2:13 pm 
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I think the toothy monster caps are great, but here's my favourite:

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ant holding a microchip. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM)


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 Post subject: Re: science to art...for the microscopic world enthusiast
PostPosted: Sat Feb 05, 2011 3:00 pm 
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meh... I don't like the colorization. Reminds me of colorized black & white movies. Seems disrespectful of the medium.


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 Post subject: Re: science to art...for the microscopic world enthusiast
PostPosted: Sat Feb 05, 2011 6:55 pm 
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Alberto wrote:
Hey Conny, psychedelic trapiche??? :lol: :lol: :lol:


Hehe, you are right. But I swapped it for a less psychedelic dito :)

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 Post subject: Re: science to art...for the microscopic world enthusiast
PostPosted: Sun Feb 06, 2011 7:48 am 
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An old Na-LTA zeolite batch gone bad: furry Na-LoSOD growing on Na-LTA cubes. :D
sem image
Image

Atomic force microscopy (this was the oldest AFM in Italy, and it was mine! :D ) pics can be cool as well...
My monogram "MV" (the distorted "V" is made on purpose, Iron Maiden font style :) ) grown (NOT scratched, growing is much more difficult) on a (010) gypsum surface.
Image
(please note the scale ;) )
How it is possible? AFM contact mode is based on probing a surface with a tiny Si nitride tip. When there's high humidity (as when your lab is like a cellar and you have no air conditioning...) a tiny water meniscus can grow around the very tip of the probe, in contact with the surface. These few molecules of water are enough to locally dissolve the gypsum and when you move the tip some water evaporates leaving behind some material larger in volume (not perfectly crystallized as the xtl surface). You move the tip and you grow this stuff. Unfortunately to take the images you have to scan the surface with the tip so some spots then grow randomly.

Let's go at higher mag! This is a similar surface. On a dry day. :) And even the best BATT lap could not produce flatter surfaces ;)
Image
The "bumps" are actually sulphate groups on a (010) gypsum surface (cleavage surface, that's why it's so perfect, at this scale).

And last an example about transmission electron microscopy (TEM)
This is a clay (nontronite, if I remember correctly). There's the particle, a local diffraction spectrum (and it's powder-like!) and a VERY difficult image to obtain: the single layers that compose the crystal structure stacking like a deck of playing cards (well, that's NOT exactly true, but let's assume that).
Image

Going back to SEM, I remember the "pulversau" ("powder pig") picture at the University of Munich. That was too cool, a powder grain shaped like a piglet. I wish I could get that pic. :)


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 Post subject: Re: science to art...for the microscopic world enthusiast
PostPosted: Sun Feb 06, 2011 7:57 am 
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definitely COOOL Marco! thx for sharing'm!! =D> =D> =D> =D>
ciao e buona domenica 8)
alberto

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 Post subject: Re: science to art...for the microscopic world enthusiast
PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2011 1:23 am 
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Marco, thanks for reminding me. :roll: Getting one tool just makes one start coveting other tools. Now that we have a SEM, I keep wishing we had a TEM.


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 Post subject: Re: science to art...for the microscopic world enthusiast
PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2011 6:25 am 
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TEM is ABSOLUTELY the microscopy tech I prefer. By far, even if I'm sure not too good at using the instrument (anyway I was good enough to get the images above). :)

Being a mix of a microscope with a diffractometer an entire world of crazy ideas opens up. I'm just waiting for the referees' response to a manuscript where I and a friend of mine (he is a TEM wizard, I'm the analysis guy...) are using TEM diffraction data to quantify the lattice preferred orientation of nanocrystals, locally. I think it's pretty neat.

TEM is really flexible: with a single instruments you can get simple imaging (also dark- and bright- field imaging, that's really cool [note for the gemologists: with dark-field here we mean something a little different than the gemmo 'scope dark field...]), diffraction (single crystal and also powder-like, in some cases, the ones I'm usually interested in), high-res imaging,... Some instruments can also get image datasets for tomographic reconstruction. Yes, I really like it. :D Too bad I'm always dealing with X-rays...

Anyway you know that whatever microscope you have (even the cheapest optical one), if you keep observing stuff, more sooner than later you'll find something funny... :mrgreen:


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 Post subject: Re: science to art...for the microscopic world enthusiast
PostPosted: Thu Feb 10, 2011 11:38 am 
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Quote:
Now that we have a SEM, I keep wishing we had a TEM


now that I have a loupe... :lol: we don't share the same values


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 Post subject: Re: science to art...for the microscopic world enthusiast
PostPosted: Thu Feb 10, 2011 11:43 am 
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cascaillou wrote:
Quote:
Now that we have a SEM, I keep wishing we had a TEM


now that I have a loupe... :lol: we don't share the same values


That must be one helluva loupe! LOL

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 Post subject: Re: science to art...for the microscopic world enthusiast
PostPosted: Thu Feb 10, 2011 4:35 pm 
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Some of those photos are the things nightmares are made of! :shock: :lol:

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