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 Post subject: AGL and GRS to collaborate
PostPosted: Sun Oct 02, 2011 5:01 pm 
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Hello all,

I don't know if you have seen the release this past week however I thought that I would put it on this forum.

http://www.aglgemlab.com/News/GRS-AGL%2 ... 202011.pdf

During this past trade show in Hong Kong, there were meetings to again discuss the nomenclature for lead-glass treated rubies. After the meetings, Adi Peretti and I met to discuss the approach of our two labs. After speaking, we found that they were quite similar in principle. Therefore we chose to cross-reference each other's nomenclature on our reports for these stones and further to begin collaborating on various topics moving forward.

We additionally believe that a closer communication and collaboration between our two labs is of mutual benefit and an important development for our clients.

Best regards,
Christopher P. Smith


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 Post subject: Re: AGL and GRS to collaborate
PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2011 2:53 am 
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That is good news indeed.

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 Post subject: Re: AGL and GRS to collaborate
PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2011 2:16 pm 
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good to have Harmonization

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 Post subject: Re: AGL and GRS to collaborate
PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2011 2:36 pm 
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Indeed this is great news that two world wide famous Gemological Laboratories are work together

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 Post subject: Re: AGL and GRS to collaborate
PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2011 2:39 pm 
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Quote:
GRS
Identification: Synthetic Glass/Treated Ruby (GRS-type “Hybrid Ruby”)*
*Comments: Heat-treated and filled with a colored foreign solid substance (including lead). Special care
required when handling. Also known as Composite Ruby.
AGL
Identification: Composite Ruby
Comments: This stone is a composite of natural ruby and a high lead content glass. Also known as
Hybrid Ruby.*
*See Enhancements section of the AGL report for additional comments related to the durability and special care of this product.


Fair enough, it's a start...why is there such a resistance to a collaboration on the actual terms used for identification by various labs?
Hybrid, composite, rubyette? A rose is a rose is a rose, no?
As long as we all agree...it's a rose. :wink:


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 Post subject: Re: AGL and GRS to collaborate
PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2012 7:04 pm 
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Quote:
GRS
Identification: Synthetic Glass/Treated Ruby (GRS-type “Hybrid Ruby”)*
*Comments: Heat-treated and filled with a colored foreign solid substance (including lead). Special care
required when handling. Also known as Composite Ruby.
AGL
Identification: Composite Ruby
Comments: This stone is a composite of natural ruby and a high lead content glass. Also known as
Hybrid Ruby.*
*See Enhancements section of the AGL report for additional comments related to the durability and special care of this product.


Why GRS is talking so categorically about "colored foreign solid substance", and AGL not?
The lead glass generally used for this treatment is colored or colorless?

(IMHO, "composite ruby" sounds much better that "hybrid")

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 Post subject: Re: AGL and GRS to collaborate
PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2012 4:23 am 
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I think the lead glass is commonly yellow in colour but there are other types of glass fillings which are colorless.

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 Post subject: Re: AGL and GRS to collaborate
PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2012 8:55 am 
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Conny is correct in that the lead-glass typically has a golden color. Others have described a lead-glass in this material with a pinkish color, but that is not as common.

The reason I don't make a specific mention on our AGL reports is because the fact that the color of the stone is augmented by the colored glass is just another intrinsic property of this material. In our publications I have gone into the multiple considerations that are intrinsic to this material, but on a gemological report we cannot address all. All of these traits/characteristics are included in what I define as a "Composite Ruby". On our reports I decided to focus on the two considerations which I believe are the most important: firstly, that this stone is a composite of natural corundum ruby and a high-lead content glass and second, the special care requirements that each and every one of these stones carries.

Best regards to all,
Christopher P. Smith


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 Post subject: Re: AGL and GRS to collaborate
PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2012 11:07 am 
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Thanks for the explanation!

Probably, although golden in larger volumes, this glass can be almost colorless when it has the thickness of small fissures and cavities, so its major action is to improve the transparence, and the color is intensified mostly due to the transparence improvement.

The GRS statement makes me to think about dying treatment, where the color of dying agent is usually much more intense than the material to treat, not like this case.

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 Post subject: Re: AGL and GRS to collaborate
PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2012 9:16 pm 
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*
Sorry, I feel I must interject my thoughts, since it has been over 3 years now that I introduced the use of the word "hybrid" to the industry in order to classify this ruby. Although Stone Group Labs is not a "world wide internationally famous gemological laboratory", we have been fairly innovative in our work.

Our original and ongoing intention for the use of "hybrid" is to classify the ruby. The word is an upper level CATEGORY, not one that is used for disclosure. Currently there exists in gemology - three categories. If the stone is not an imitation, or a synthetic then by default if falls into the natural category. By adding this new category or classification of hybrid, the stone immediately identifies itself as being different.

I know that this concept would be a major addition to the gemological industry, but it would certainly be a good one, and one that is urgently needed in this day and age.

Natural Ruby
Synthetic Ruby
Imitation Ruby
Hybrid Ruby

When you think about it these stones are unique from the other traditional categories in that they can be a mix of a stone of natural origin, with components of synthetic or simulant within them. Once categorised properly, then this material can be correctly disclosed as a lead glass-filled composite.

Other Stones May Apply
There are other hybrid stones whose treatments have stepped beyond their original structure, like heavily treated emeralds where there may be the same % of polymers in them as there is lead glass in ruby. Also certain jade that has been acid bathed to remove the carbonate based impurities. They then have those resulting cavities and fissures subjected to color enhancement, with the final infilling of a hardened synthetic epoxy resin. At our lab we have already seen over a dozen variety of hybrid beads that are basically composite in nature.

I am pleased beyond measure that GRS and AGL have deemed it fit for use. Perhaps one day it can be used in the context it was originally designed for.

Thanks for your consideration and time, and pardon the intrusion on the AGL channel.
Bear Williams


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